Technology Pointe Blog

Technology Pointe has been serving the Round Rock area since 2000, providing IT Support such as technical helpdesk support, computer support, and consulting to small and medium-sized businesses.

Getting to the Cloud - Part 1: What & Why

One of the first questions any potential client asks is if they should go to the cloud. A close second is what is the cloud and why would I want to go? This should give you an idea of how much momentum the cloud has, many people are asking if they should move to the cloud without knowing what it is or why. For our blog articles, I polled several customers and this post was by far the most requested.

One of the first questions any potential client asks is if they should go to the cloud. A close second is what is the cloud and why would I want to go? This should give you an idea of how much momentum the cloud has, many people are asking if they should move to the cloud without knowing what it is or why. For our blog articles, I polled several customers and this post was by far the most requested.

Please keep in mind that this article is written towards a specific audience - small and medium businesses with no or tiny (1 or 2 person) IT departments, who still value IT in their business (i.e. are looking for helpful technology, not trying to cut costs with no regard for any value.)

What is the cloud?

There are a lot of definitions, but I love a very basic explanation I heard recently: the cloud is your data running on someone else's servers. This is a gross simplification but it is true. Office 365? Your email on Microsoft's servers. More importantly though, the cloud is your data on somebody else's servers, which are more redundant and more powerful than what most small businesses can achieve on their own. More on that in a bit.

Why would I want to go to the cloud?

As I mentioned, the cloud is more powerful and reliable than what most small businesses can do on their own. If your IT department is not big enough to support any full time staff, the cloud is likely not going to be a cost savings for most services (email being a notable exception.) What it can do for you is to provide much better services at a similar price to running it in house. A true datacenter environment has a number of key features for up-time:

  • Multiple internet connections with near seamless failover
  • Redundant power: diesel generators on-site, heavy duty battery backup, multiple power feeds
  • Redundant, heavy duty cooling
  • On-site 24x7 IT staff
  • Secure facility with badge and/or biometric security, video surveillance

If you want to match this level of service at your office, it gets extremely expensive fast. This is where you can leverage the cloud, the economies of scale allow you access to this level of service at a reasonable price.

(You can certainly use the cloud as a straight money saving measure but often you will be cutting significant corners with security, reliability or performance.)

Should I go to the cloud?

Stay tuned for part 2!

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Tuesday, 21 November 2017

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